Online educational resource on achieving indoor environmental quality with radiant based HVAC systems
Not for profit educational resource on indoor environmental quality.
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Fundamentals of indoor environmental quality / thermal comfort and air quality solutions using radiant based HVAC

Introduction
Human Physiology 1
Human Physiology 2
Human Physiology 3
Human Physiology 4

Human Physiology 5

Conclusion


There are over 166,000 thermal sensors covering a nominal 20 sq. ft. of skin on the human body...and we expect a single thermostat connected to a furnace to satisfy them...

go ahead take a few minutes to think about.

Our Message:

We don't condition buildings, we condition people.


The Perfect Thermostat
Your Brain

"It came programmed at birth and you don't have to touch it.  It doesn't have any dials and no fancy blinking lights. It works 24/7/365 and in all weather conditions. It doesn't need spare parts and requires no external source of power. It is perfect." Robert Bean
Message at the 2005 HRAI AGM


"....the perfect heating and cooling system would be based principally on human comfort factors." Michael McDonough
Architect


"...the knowledge of the temperature contributes to our feelings of comfort and acceptability."
F. Rohles,Jr., Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus,
Kansas State University

 

 

Human Physiology 4, The Mind - Body's Sensory Systems
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The skin sensors are connected to the nerves which are connected to the spinal cord which is connected to your hypothalamus located in your brain. Your hypothalamus makes decisions on how to control your thermal comfort. It came programmed at birth and you don't have to touch it.  It doesn't have any dials and no fancy blinking lights. It works 24/7/365 and in all weather conditions. It doesn't need spare parts and requires no external source of power.

The Brain - YOUR BRAIN - is the real thermostat in your house and it is perfect.

Infloor heating satisfies the human comfort factor

Map of the "Tactile" Cortex.
The various parts of the body are drawn proportionally to the number of neurons inside the relative projection areas.

What architectural , interior and mechanical designers should note is how important the feet, hands and head are to sensing the interior environmental conditions. For example, "the fingers of the hand send stimuli to an area of the cortex equal to that which elaborates the stimuli of all the rest of the body."1

That's why radiant skin losses from the neck, head, and hands plus conductive losses through the feet in contact with cool floors contribute to discomfort more than any other area of the body.  It is the #1 reason why radiant based HVAC systems are the ideal natural solution to improving ones indoor environmental quality.  Blowing air may be cheap and low cost but not and will never be a human based solution to comfort conditioning.


Your Brain - Your Thermostat, Part I

We learned in Human Physiology 3 that our skin has tens of thousands of sensors which feed information to our brain.  The part which is important to thermal comfort is the hypothalamus.

Your brain controls your comfort

Image reproduced with permission from the American Medical Association.  Source: AMA's Current Procedural Terminology, Revised 1998 Edition. CPT is a trademark of the American Medical Association. Copyright 1995-2005 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.


The interior environmental conditions are picked up by your skin and fed into your brain through groups of sensory nerves connected to the spinal cord which is connected to the hypothalamus.  Illustrated below are the nerve groups.

 

Nerves carry thermal information to the brain

Image reproduced with permission from the American Medical Association. Copyright 1995-2005 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.

There are tens of thousands of skin sensors connected to your nerves

Image reproduced with permission from the American Medical Association.  Source: AMA's Current Procedural Terminology, Revised 1998 Edition. CPT is a trademark of the American Medical Association. Copyright 1995-2005 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.

 

 

Click here to visit Human Physiology 5


1. Copyright (c) 2005, GIUNTI PUBLISHING GROUP, Via Dante, 4, 20121, MILANO , All Rights Reserved, Republished by www.healthyheating.com with restricted permission from GIUNTI PUBLISHING GROUP, Atlas of Anatomy
2. Copyright (c) 2005, American Medical Association, Republished by www.healthyheating.com with restricted permission from the AMA


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